Bringing Indie Theater to the Classroom


by Ryan Emmons and Julie Congress · August 4, 2014


Visit FringeNYC's website for venue info

Our names are Ryan Emmons and Julie Congress and we are the Co-Directors of New York Thespians (the New York chapter of the Educational Theatre Association). New York Thespians is a student honorary organization, recognizing the achievements of high school and middle school students. 

The New York chapter promotes dialogue, communication and interaction between theatre programs throughout New York state. We believe that it is through the sharing of best practices and resources that the artistry and educational impact of educational theatre will continue to grow. We further believe that theatre education should be available for all students. To this end, the New York chapter hosts an annual state festival which brings together middle and high school students and teachers from across the state. The 6th Annual New York Educational Theatre Festival will be held on Saturday, April 25, 2015 at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts and features a full day of workshops, adjudicated events, an all-festival tech challenge and student leadership and scholarship opportunities. For more information, visit www.newyorkthespians.org or email us at newyorkedta@gmail.com.

Theatre provides critical life skills necessary for educational and career success. We hope this panel promotes a dialogue about the various ways that theatre educators and theatre programs can help to support one another. We are also curious about how broad the spectrum of theatre being taught is. Particularly in New York City, it is easy for theatre programs to teach that success is working on a Broadway show. FringeNYC is a great example of professional theatre artists contributing to the art form in a different way. How do we measure “success” to young theatre artists? What do we glorify and what are the effects of that lesson? How can we expose NYC students to the amazing breadth of theatre in their city? This panel is about dialogue – not about finding answers.

 

 

 

 

More about the playwright in this article:
Broken Bone Bathtub
After being asked who is comfortable with audience participation, we are lead one by one into the small room and guided to our seats. A young woman sits amid pleasantly floral scented bubbles, face turned away from us.
Broken Bone Bathtub
After being asked who is comfortable with audience participation, we are lead one by one into the small room and guided to our seats. A young woman sits amid pleasantly floral scented bubbles, face turned away from us.
Adapting: Five Takeaways
The fifth (and last) in a five part series on adapting a play from a novel as it occurs.