More on "In the Bones"


by Mel House · November 19, 2014


Mel House in IN THE BONES

Mel House, who has been contributing to nytheater now for many years now, is in the cast of Cody Daigle's new play In the Bones at Astoria Performing Arts Center. I asked her about the experience and specifically why this was a play she wanted to work on. Here's what she said to me: (Photo is by Michael Dekker.)

"Sometimes a play comes to you just when you need it. That's how I feel about In The Bones. After first reading it, I was deeply moved by the story and excited to dig into the role of Kate. She is sassy, strong and so very hungry for loving approval.

"This play creates space for reflection on the importance of good health care for Veterans, the need for better mental health care in our time, the cost of war and the need for marriage equality. But Cody didn't write an overtly political play. Instead, he allows us to explore the universal experience of grief and the search for healing. What I'm struck with at the end of the play is a call to our deepest humanity to recognize, embrace, respect and celebrate the miracle of life.

"I write this at the bedside of my Foster Mom. We recently learned that she has cancer, but because of complications, she will die all too soon. Her children are scared and angry and fighting. But I have this play in my bones that is giving me the deepest compassion for the grief of those around me. And I am witnessing this encouraging more compassion. I look forward to doing this play again tomorrow night, because it ha been a tremendous gift for me to experience it and I'm grateful for the opportunity to share it."

We thank Mel for sharing her reflections on this beautiful script. Check out In the Bones on Indie Theater Now and at APAC this week!

 

 

 

 

More about the play in this article:
Broken Bone Bathtub
After being asked who is comfortable with audience participation, we are lead one by one into the small room and guided to our seats. A young woman sits amid pleasantly floral scented bubbles, face turned away from us.
Broken Bone Bathtub
After being asked who is comfortable with audience participation, we are lead one by one into the small room and guided to our seats. A young woman sits amid pleasantly floral scented bubbles, face turned away from us.
Adapting: Five Takeaways
The fifth (and last) in a five part series on adapting a play from a novel as it occurs.